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Full text of "Specifications : the original Holland enamel paint."




Specifications 



RIPOLIN 



1 .(A >| V1AM* 



The Original Holland Enamel Paint 



THE RIPOLIN COMPANY' 



PARIS l< )N WMIKDW1 \I) 

KK Wi HOI I \M) I \ 



THE ORIGINAL HOLLAND ENAMEL PAINT 



INDEX Page 

Ash, Oak, Walnut 6 

Bass Wood 5 

Bath Room Walls 7 

Bath Tubs, Copper, Zinc, Galvanized Iron 10 

Boats' Hulls, etc 9 

Brick Walls 8 

Cedar, Cypress, Hemlock 5 

Cement, Portland or Concrete 8 

Copper 9 

Cracks, Mixture for Filling , 8 

Exterior Iron , 9 

Exterior Surfaces, General 9 

Flat Enameling 4 

Furniture Enameling, Wood 10 

Furniture Enameling, Iron 10 

Galvanized Iron ' 9 

General Instructions 3.4 

Georgia Pine, Yellow Pine, etc. \ 5 

Hemlock, Cedar, Cypress, etc \ 5 

Imitation Tile on Keen's Cement, etc \ 7 

Interior Woodwork : 

Whitewood, White Pine, Bass Wood, etc 5 

Cedar, Cypress, Hemlock, etc ] 5 

Yellow Pine, Georgia Pine • 5 

Oak, Ash, Walnut, etc .*."." 6 

Interior Brick Work 8 

Interior Iron \ 9 

Iron Furniture 10 

Iron Work ' 9 

Keen's Cement, King's Windsor, etc 7 

Mat or Flat Effects .*."."." 3-4 

Metal Ceilings, Walls, etc ' g 

New Plaster Walls, etc 7 

Oak, Ash, Walnut " g 

Outside Surfaces ' 9 

Plaster Walls, unpainted \ 7 

Plaster Walls, previously painted ' ] 6 

Portland Cement, or Concrete . ...*."" 8 

Rubbed Effect or Semi-gloss ! ! . ! 3-4 

Semi-gloss ....!!!!. 3-4 

Tile Effects on Cement or Plaster 7 

Unpainted Plaster Walls . . . 7 

Varnished Surfaces 6 

Walls previously painted ] . . . 6 

Walnut, Oak, Ash, etc . . . 6 

Whitewood, White Pine, etc 5 

Woodwork previously painted ...... 6 

Woodwork previously varnished .... " 6 

Yachts' Hulls, etc. " '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 9 

Yellow Pine, Georgia Pine, etc .5 

Zinc \ \ 9 



RIPOLIN SPECIFICATIONS 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 

Ripolin is furnished in High Gloss, Semi-Gloss (Eggshell) and Dead Flat White. 
Any finish desired between the High Gloss and Dead Flat can be obtained by mixing 
in varying proportions. 

To obtain any of the lighter shades White Ripolin may be tinted by the use of 
pure color ground in Japan, thinning down the color with a small quantity of tur- 
pentine and adding slowly to the enamel until the desired color is obtained. We do 
not, of course, recommend the addition of a large amount of coloring matter to ob- 
tain any of the darker shades, but will supply various darker shades on order. The 
Architectural Tints now carried in regular stock are listed on page 4. 

Where Ripolin is to be used in colors of any depth, the under-coats should be 
tinted a shade similar to the final coat. 

To obtain the best results with Ripolin Enamel, the under-coats should be thor- 
oughly rubbed with 00 sandpaper, or with fine steel wool and all prominent brush- 
marks removed so that a perfectly smooth surface is prepared before the application 
of the enamel. Ripolin of itself will show a perfectly smooth, even surface with- 
out brush-marks, but will not cover irregularities in the under-coating, and for this 
reason great care should be exercised to keep the working pots, brushes and surface 
to be worked upon free from dust, grit, or other foreign matter. Cans of Ripolin 
Enamel when not in use should be kept tightly covered. For extremely fine work 
where the extra expense may be allowed, after rubbing the last under-coat with steel 
wool or sandpaper it should be further lightly rubbed with pumice and water. Also, 
where there are two coats of enamel to be applied the first coat of enamel should be 
rubbed with pumice rather than with sandpaper or steel wool. 

Do not thin Ripolin, but use it as it comes from the can. In cold weather means 
should be taken to heat the room, or if this is impossible the Ripolin can be warmed 
by standing the can in a pail of hot water. The best work can be done where the 
room temperature is not less than 75°. Enamel paint when chilled becomes thicker 
and is harder to apply, but when warm flows out more easily and covers a greater 
surface than when cold. The use of thinners or the promiscuous use of turpentine 
should be avoided. If it is absolutely essential to use turpentine, expose it a half 
hour before use in an open vessel to allow the most active of the gases to be evap- 
orated and thin only sparingly. 

In the use of two coats of Ripolin it is allowable to add a small proportion of 
turpentine to the first coat. 

Semi-Gloss Ripolin makes an ideal next to the final coat, — that is, whatever the 
degree of gloss the final coat is to be it will be a more perfect coat if applied over 
Semi-Gloss Ripolin. 

In past years the recommendation has always been made that the under-coats 
for any enamel be flat coats, — that is, with a decreasing amount of oil from the first 
to the last under-coat. The present tendency is to replace this oil in part, or in 
whole, with enamel, — and Ripolin Enamel used in place of oil in under-coats will 
help the working quality as well as the wearing quality of the paint ; will be a sealer, 
and will eliminate to a great extent the tendency of the under-coats to discolor the 
enamel through the chemical action of the atmosphere on the surface and the oils 
on the under side of the enamel finish. 

Over-emphasis cannot be laid on the importance of the under-coats, and master 
painters affirm that the priming coat is the most important coat on almost any paint 
work. Not only the perfect laying of the coats but the perfect rubbing down be- 
tween is important. Naturally, the more under-coats, with careful rubbing, the 
greater perfection of result, and on some extra fine work the number of coats is 
raised from six, which we specify, to even eight or nine, — care being taken that in 
any instance the last two coats are Ripolin. 

Different degrees of lustre may be obtained by the use of Semi-Gloss Ripolin, — 
or Gloss and Flat in different proportions. Semi-Gloss Ripolin as furnished in the 
can is mixed three parts of Flat to one part of Gloss. To obtain a Semi-Gloss or 



THE ORIGINAL HOLLAND ENAMEL PAINT 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS— continued. 

other low lustre finish, specify Ripolin in the Semi-Gloss as it comes from the can 
or Ripolin in the proportion you may wish of Flat and Gloss, — the under-coats to be 
as advised for a high lustre. 

To obtain Dead Flat or "Matte" effect the surface should be prepared as for 
any other degree of lustre, — then apply two coats of Flat Ripolin as it comes from the 
can. 

NOTE : — The first coat of Flat Ripolin may be considered a ground coat and 
should be applied in the same manner as applying ordinary oil paint. The second, 
or finish-coat flattens upon the first and must be applied with a full, flowing coat, 
spreading same nearly as quickly as flat varnishing, and leaving it to settle down. 
The work must be cut up sharp and clean as in ordinary flatting, as a touch on the 
set surface will show glossy. Flat Ripolin should not be worked too long for this 
reason. Ripolin can ordinarily be stippled where desired or is found necessary, but 
under ordinary conditions results may be obtained without. 

It is usually unnecessary to rub Ripolin, as the desired lustre may be obtained 
by using Ripolin in the degree of gloss desired. Thus a heavy item of expense may 
be saved. In case rubbing is desired, it is preferable to recommend that Semi-Gloss 
Ripolin be used, as this degree of finish will require less labor and possesses more 
depth of body than the High Gloss, on account of the additional amount of pigment. 
No attempt should be made to rub within 72 hours, and if a longer time can be allowed 
the ultimate results will compensate for the delay. One of the most artistic effects 
obtainable is produced by rubbing Flat Ripolin with pumice and water, thus the high 
lights are emphasized due to the greater amount of pressure on the more exposed 
surfaces, while the shadows are not brought up to so great an extent as would be 
with Gloss, thereby producing what is often termed "an architectural finish." 

Ordinary cleaning of a Ripolin surface may be done with warm water and soap. 
It is often, however, preferable to clean in some other way than with soap because 
of the danger of the film of soap being left on the surface to yellow and collect dirt. 
A satisfactory method is to clean with French Whiting. Moisten a piece of cheese- 
cloth and dip it into a small container of Whiting. If this is applied to the enamel 
finish it will thoroughly cleanse and yet will leave no film of grease and will require 
no cleaning off except possibly wiping down after a short time with a clean piece of 
dry cheese-cloth. 

COLORS CARRIED IN STOCK IN THIS COUNTRY. 

No. 1 (Gloss White), No. 101 Semi-Gloss White (Eggshell), No. 501 (Flat White). 
No. 53 Ivory, No. 5 Black, No. 2 Cream, No. 47 Light Grav, No. 18 Light Blue, No 44 
Sea Green, No. 10 Pearl Gray, No. 65 Pink. All tints are regularlv carried in the 
Gloss, Ivory and Light Gray also in the Semi-Gloss. Special qualities and colors of 
Ripolin can be furnished for use under exceptional circumstances. 

The best result to the client is obtained by following our specifications accur- 
ately. In case conditions differ from any specifications found in this book we should 
be pleased to supply special specifications in answer to any request. 

A strict interpretation of the specifications with no substitution allowed will 
produce results not only of exceptional beauty when first put on, but of greater 
wearing quality than if any substitute be used. 

. The wide range of uses to which Ripolin may be put is not generallv appreciated. 
It is most commonly used in High Gloss for bath-room and kitchen walls The per- 
fection of this result for these purposes can be equaled with Flat or Semi-Gloss Ripo- 
lin for other interiors High Gloss Ripolin is particularly valuable as a finish for the 
*""? specially of porch rails and pillars of a seashore residence, as it is not powdered 
°u I tf a aiF * ^P HV S ec l uall >* satisfactory for other extreme conditions, 
whether it be your automobile or boat, or whether for a fine up-to-date dairv 

European architects have tested Ripolin for all sorts of purposes for a period of 
30 years and have proven its superiority. American architects have seen it in 
use over there and are learning its value for conditions in this country 



R1POLIN SPECIFICATE 



CIF1CAI | 1 

AU .RA1NLD INTERIOR NEW V. jRK 

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•if pur« turp#ntin# to th# f *Jlon. 









6 THE ORIGINAL HOLLAND ENAMEL PAINT 

SPECIFICATION NO. 3. 
INTERIOR NEW WOODWORK— continued. 

(Oak, Ash and other open grained woods.) 

A coat of Adelite Paste Wood Filler should be well rubbed into the surface. 
After this is dry and hard sandpaper the work thoroughly. 

Coat No. 1. — A priming coat of Ripolin Enamel Under-coating, thinned with 1 pint 
of raw linseed oil and 1 pint of pure spirits of turpentine to the gallon. 

Coat No. 2. — Full coat of Ripolin Enamel Under-coating. 

Coat No. 3. — Full coat of Ripolin Enamel Under-coating. 

Coat No. 4. — Ripolin Enamel Under-coating re-enforced with 1 quart Gloss Ripolin 
added to the gallon to stop suction. 

Coat No. 5. — A good flowing coat of Ripolin. It is allowable to thin this coat with 
y% pint of pure turpentine to the gallon. 

Coat No. 6. — A good flowing coat of Ripolin as it comes from the can. Do not thin 
finishing coat of Ripolin. 

N. B. — If expense is of prime importance, either coat No. 3 or coat No. 5 (only 
one) may be omitted. 

SPECIFICATION NO. 4. 

OLD WOODWORK PREVIOUSLY VARNISHED OR FINISHED 

"NATURAL WOOD." 

If the old varnish is checked, disintegrated or alligatored, it must be thoroughly 
removed with a first-class remover such as Adelite or by completely sandpapering. 
If, however, the varnish is in good condition it may be rubbed down and thoroughly 
cleansed to remove all foreign matter which might prevent perfect bonding to the 
varnish surface. Great care must be taken that sandpaper dust is removed. 

Coat No. 1. — Ripolin Enamel Under-coating re-enforced with one pint of Gloss 
Ripolin to the gallon. 

Coat No. 2. — Same as Coat No. 1. 

Coat No. 3. — A flowing coat of Ripolin which may be thinned by adding 1/2 P^t 
pure spirits of turpentine to the gallon. 

Coat No. 4. — A flowing coat of Ripolin as it comes from the can. Do not thin this 
finishing coat of Ripolin. 

SPECIFICATION NO. 5. 

PLASTER WALLS OR WOODWORK PREVIOUSLY PAINTED. 

Old paint should be thoroughly cleaned and if white it should be washed down 
with strong soda and warm water, all traces of soda to be removed by thorough wash- 
ing, or it should be cleaned with French whiting as mentioned in the general speci- 
fications. 

Coat No. 1.— Ripolin Enamel Under-coating re-enforced with one pint of Gloss 
Ripolin to the gallon. 

Coat No. 2. — A good flowing coat of Ripolin as taken from the can. 

NOTE:— If the old paint is white and in good condition it may be possible to 
apply the Ripolin direct without Coat No. 1, and if colored Ripolin is used it would 
not be necessary to use Coat No. 1 unless your paint is darker in tone than the Ripolin 
color to be used. If old paint is in bad condition two coats the same as Coat No. 1 
should be used, with one coat of Ripolin as a finish. 



RIPOLIN SPECIF1CATK 



CIF1CA1 ). 6. 

NEW OR I iED PLASTER W AL 

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THE ORIGINAL HOLLAND ENAMEL PAINT 



SPECIFICATION NO. 8. 

MIXTURES FOR FILLING CRACKS IN CHIPPED CEILINGS, WALLS 

OR PLASTER. 

Authorities disagree as to the best crack filling mixture. Either of the follow- 
ing would doubtless be satisfactory. Take whiting or plaster of Paris in the follow- 
ing proportions. One quarter of plaster of Paris and three quarters of whiting by 
weight. Mix these to an easily working consistency by slowly adding varnish (any 
kind or grade of varnish will do). If this mixture sets too quickly the proportion of 
plaster of Paris is too large. 

Second formula is to take three pounds of whiting, adding to this a half pint of 
liquid glue, which is usually in the proportion of two ounces of glue thinned to a half 
pint with water. Add enough more water to make this into a very thick paste, then 
add about a gill of varnish. Work this up thoroughly and stiffen it to a good putty 
consistency by the addition of plaster of Paris. 

SPECIFICATION NO. 9. 

CONCRETE OR PORTLAND CEMENT. 

Owing to the excess of free alkali and occasionally certain chemical conditions 
created by the process of manufacture of Portland Cement or concrete under various 
formulae difficulty has been experienced in obtaining paints to adhere firmly to these 
surfaces. The concrete or cement must be thoroughly dry. All new concrete should 
be washed with a 30 c /c zinc sulphate solution. 

Coat No. 1. — Stucolor Cement Coating which may be thinned with about a quart 
of turpentine to the gallon. 

Coat No. 2. — The same approved Cement Coating as it comes from the can. 

Coat No. 3. — A good full coat of Ripolin of the lustre desired as taken from the can. 

N. B. — On a very rough laid cement an extra coat may be required to thoroughly 
cover the color of the surface, this being Ripolin Enamel Under-coating. For much 
exposed surfaces it is well to add one more coat of Ripolin as it comes from the can 
In case two coats of enamel seem necessary it is well to make the first coat Semi- 
Gloss Ripolin, the finish coat to be of the lustre desired. 

SPECIFICATION NO. 10. 

INTERIOR BRICK WORK. 

On account of the tendency of brick surfaces, particularly new ones, to "salt," it 
is advisable to treat brick in exactly the same way as concrete. See Specification 
No. 9. 

SPECIFICATION NO. 11. 

METAL CEILINGS AND WALLS. 

Coat No. 1. — Ripolin Enamel Under-coating thinned with one pint of turpentine to 
the gallon. 

Coat No. 2.— Ripolin Enamel Under-coating which has been re-enforced with one 
quart of Ripolin to the gallon. 

Coat No. 3. — Ripolin as it comes from the can in the degree of luster required. 

GENERAL NOTE. 
In all specifications the proportion of pigment and vehicle should be such as to 
make the paint of good working consistency. 



R1POLIN SPECIFICATIONS 



SPECIFICATION NO. 12. 
GALVANIZED IRON INTERIOR OR EXTERIOR. 

Priming coats of lead should never be used on galvanized iron under Ripolin. 
Wash surface with 10% solution of acetic acid, all trace of acid should be re- 
moved before painting. 

Coat No. 1. — Add one quart of turpentine to a gallon of Gloss Ripolin. Apply a thin 
coat and well brushed out. Allow this to dry at least twenty-four 
hours. 
Coat No. 2. — Semi-Gloss Ripolin as it comes from the can. 
Coat No. 3. — A full coat of Ripolin of the lustre desired, as it comes from the can. 

GENERAL NOTE. 

For all exterior work the final coat should always be Gloss Ripolin as it is more 
weather resistant than the lesser degrees of gloss. 

SPECIFICATION NO. 13. 
EXTERIOR OR INTERIOR IRON WORK. 

See that the surface of the iron is thoroughly clean and free from rust, grease 
and dirt. 
Coat No. 1. — Gloss Rrpolin thinned with three pints of turpentine to the gallon. 

This is used in this way to bond perfectly to the metal. 
Coat No. 2. — Semi-Gloss Ripolin as it comes from the can. 
Coat No. 3. — Good full coat of Ripolin of the lustre desired as taken from the can. 

SPECIFICATION NO. 14. 
ZINC. 

Thoroughly clean the surface with benzine or turpentine as any trace of oil will 
prevent the Ripolin from adhering to the zinc. Then use the same coats as for gal- 
vanized iron. See Specification No. 12. 

SPECIFICATION NO. 15. 
COPPER. 

First thoroughly scour the copper with Sapolio and then wash off with hot water 
to remove all grease or foreign matter. The Sapolio will also cause a slight roughen- 
ing of the copper, which though unseen will greatly assist the Ripolin coat to adhere 
to the copper. Before applying any enamel be sure that the Sapolio is thoroughly 
washed oft the copper. 
Coat No. 1. — Apply a thin coat of Gloss Ripolin to which turpentine has been added 

in the proportion of three pints of turpentine to the gallon. This 

thin coat will dry quicker and adhere better to the copper. 
Coat No. 2. — Semi-Gloss Ripolin as taken from the can. This should be spread 

with a good, stocky varnish brush and flowed on evenly. 
Coat No. 3. — After Coat No. 2 has stood until well set, apply another good flowing 

coat of Ripolin as taken from the can. 
If the above does not give a sufficiently dense body, another coat may be applied. 

SPECIFICATION NO. 16. 
YACHTS OR BOATS' HULLS. 

Should be treated according to the material of which the hull is made. See 
specifications for wood, copper, etc. 

Remember that Ripolin will not overcome brush marks remaining in the under-coats. There- 
fore it is imperative for good work that the under-coats shall be sanded until smooth before Ripolin 
is applied. 



10 THE ORIGINAL HOLLAND ENAMEL PAINT 

SPECIFICATION NO. 17. 

WOOD EXTERIOR SURFACES. 

FOR OLD WORK. 

On old work remove all loose or scaly paint and wash thoroughly to remove dirt. 
Touch up all bare spots with Coat No. 1 as below, using one quart of linseed oil to the 
gallon. Apply one or two coats of full Gloss Ripolin. 

FOR NEW WORK. 

Coat No. 1. — A priming coat of Ripolin Enamel Under-coating thinned with one 
quart raw linseed oil and a pint pure turpentine to the gallon. 

Coat No. 2. — A full coat of Ripolin Enamel Under-coating. 

Coat No. 3 — Ripolin Under-coating re-enforced with one quart Gloss Ripolin to the 
gallon. 

Coat No. 4. — A good full coat of Gloss Ripolin as it comes from the can. 

SPECIFICATION NO. 18. 

BATH TUBS. 

Copper. 

Foil' on No. 15 on pa 

Zinc or Tin. 
Follow specification for zinc No. 1 1 on page 9. 
Moss Ripolin should always be u purpose. 

NOTE: — To insure the best results four days should be allowed betw< 
coat, and each should be absolutely dry before applying succeeding coats. 

previously painl scaly places should bo removed 

ring. The tub must bo thoroughly scoured with benzine or strong BOlu- 
ofsodaai I remove all ti. oap and grease, as any traa 

e the paint to peel. The soda must all be washed oil. 
er the fii tub with cold water ono 

<hl flOt hi U$( <i hi f ,1-t ( ,( <■■ 

SPECIFICATION NO. 19. 
WOODEN FURNITURE. 

hould be 

SPECIFICATION NO. 20. 
IRON FURNITURE PREVIOUSLY PAINTED OR ENAMELED. 

re foundation to 

. i should be evened 

ick. 

| liltle N 

when th< 
wfaito 



Remember that Ripolin will not overcome brush marks remaining in the under-coati. I 
fore it i» imperative for good work that the under-coats shall be aanded until sri ;>olin 

is applied. 



RIPOLIN SPECIFICATIONS 11 



AFTERWORD. 

It is impossible to overestimate the importance of proper application. The care- 
ful application and treatment of the under-coats is absolutely essential to obtain any 
fine enamel job. 

Please be reminded once more that: 
"A" — The greater the number of under-coats, the better the job. 

U B" — Perfection of surface can be obtained only by perfection of under-coats. 
Therefore, each coat should be lightly rubbed with fine sandpaper or steel 
wool. 

"C" — Ripolin is a true enamel and spreads farther and makes a more perfect surface 
when used in a warm temperature. 

"D" — The use of Ripolin in the top under-coat seals the surface, prevents suction 
and gives the enamel coats an opportunity to stand out as they should. 

"E" — Many jobs of painting are not given a fair chance as they are rushed too much. 
If any coat is not thoroughly dry when the succeeding coat is applied, it gives 
opportunity for the fresh coat to flat down and as it is likely to be unevenly 
dried, the last coat will be flatted unevenly. 

«F" — Copies of these specifications will gladly be supplied to any architect or con- 
tractor bidding. 



RIPOLIN TINTS 



On page four we list the various Tints in which Ripolin can be supplied. Color 
Cards will be sent on application. 

There are more Tints in this list than with other enamels. They are exceed- 
ingly attractive, either for use singly, or in combination. 

White with various Tints, or such attractive combinations as Ivory and Light 
Gray, give particularly pleasing decorative effects. 

A selection of Tints from the card insures your clients obtaining exactly the 
combination they choose and does away with possibility of error in tinting. 




The Greater Glidden Organization 



The Glidden Company, Cleveland 

The Adams and Elting Co., Chicago 

The Nubian Paint and Varnish Co., 
Chicago 

Twin City Varnish Co., St. Paul, 
Minn. 

The Forest City Paint and Varnish 
Co., Cleveland 

The Glidden Co., Ltd., Toronto, 
Ont., Canada 

The Glidden Company of Massa- 
chusetts, Boston 



The Heath and Milligan Co., 

Chicago 
The Campbell Paint and Varnish 

Co., St. Louis 
A. Wilhelm Co., Reading, Pa. 
T. L. Blood & Co., St. Paul, Minn. 
The American Paint Works, 

New Orleans 
The Glidden Co. of California, 

San Francisco 
The Glidden Company of Texas, 

Dallas 




Form CB-47-*-25